Railways introduces RO-RO to free the roads and clean the air of Delhi
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A new initiative comes as a saviour to New Delhi which is battling with air pollution for over a year. Studies found that more than half of the pollutants were emitted from the diesel-run trucks that ply through National Capital Region daily. To tackle the issue, Railways launched a service called  Roll-on Roll-off (RO-RO) today in Gurugram.

This new measure can de-congest the roads drastically, thereby also reducing pollution, as it will carry the trucks to their respective destinations in comparatively less time. The train, carrying 30 loaded trucks, made its first journey from Garhi Harsuru station in Gurugram to Muradnagar in Uttar Pradesh.

Railway Minister Suresh Prabhu said, “The RO-RO is a boon for Delhi as it would have a direct impact on its air ambient quality and the capital would breathe clean air.”

According to the reports, 66,000 trucks that pass through Delhi every day, 20,000 trucks enter the city only to travel further as the capital connects many states. This step will not only lessen the pollution levels but also saves energy and time.

The series of measures launched on Thursday along with RO-RO, which aim at elevating the revenues for railways. Earlier, PM Modi suggested advertising big brands on train coaches to fetch maximum revenues. Today, it was revealed that increase in freight shares and passenger segments are to bring about the desired results. The committee plans to start 100 new freight terminals and 12 feet 8 inches high double stack dwarf containers that will carry maximum goods in less time from Punjab to Gujarat on an electrified route. “The business plan-2017-18 was formulated to cater to the requirement of stakeholders and we have changed the policy after discussion with our customers.” continued Prabhu.

The plan is to settle long-term agreements with its freight customers, including cement, steel and fertiliser to attract more loadings. Earlier railways relied on only 8 customers for freight share, some of which were iron, coal, cement, etc., and now, many more customers are believed to be roped in for the same.