Theresa May may have known about the malfunction in the Trident test

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Theresa May is under immense pressure to answer one of the burning questions that have emerged in the political storm that is this week. Did she know that there was something wrong with the nuclear system of her country, when she asked MPs to renew the famed Trident system?
It has recently come to light that Theresa May might have been briefed about the faulty system before the parliament voted for its renewal. There is believed to have been a serious malfunction with the operation of the missiles, which were to be headed for west coast of Africa, however, were erroneously aimed towards Florida.
Her spokesperson has insisted that the tests were a success and the missile system is actively protecting the country. MPs have complained that there was not a more elaborate explanation to the controversy.

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The Trident is a trinity of submarines, missiles and warheads, set to expire in the late 2020s. It was originally acquired by Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s.
Although May was not in office when the tests took place, the responsibility has now fallen on her shoulders to take the blame of a “cover up”.
Downing Street and the MoD issued a statement claiming that the capability and effectiveness of Trident was “unquestionable”.
“In June the Royal Navy conducted a routine, unarmed Trident missile test launch from HMS Vengeance, as part of an operation which is designed to certify the submarine and its crew.
“Vengeance and her crew were successfully tested and certified, allowing Vengeance to return into service. We have absolute confidence in our independent nuclear deterrent.”
There are those to oppose the entire existence of such a system. Labour’s leader Jeremy Corbyn has said that he could never be the one to “press the button”.
Some who object on ethical grounds say the UK should never be a country that is willing to threaten or use nuclear weapons against an adversary, even in the most extreme circumstances and that the humanitarian consequences of doing that would be so grotesque as to be unfathomable, says Rusi’s Andrea Berger.